MS and Cognitive Impairment

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In this video I talk about the cognitive impairment associated with my MS, and how it’s helped me take myself less seriously while (weirdly) improving my methods of goal setting. Watch it and let me know what you think by clicking the “comments” link below.

How to Live Abundantly with MS

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The more research I do into MS the more personal Heroes I find. How amazing to know that there are so many people out there who do not consider themselves “victims” of a disease, who don’t lose hope, who still love themselves and their lives even when facing issues that might emotionally cripple other people. The author of this article is “planning her next remission” while lying in bed during a relapse. How amazing is she?! Read what she has to say and let me know what you think by hitting the “comment” link below.

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Living Life Fully and Abundantly with MS

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Diet and MS

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I was doing some research on how diet can affect MS, and I came across this article that pretty much describes why I started wondering whether or not the food that I eat could affect my energy levels. It stands to reason that it would, I think. Take a look at this article and tell me what you think, about the concept of disease management through diet, by clicking the “comment” link below.

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Multiple Sclerosis Diet Therapy – Does Diet Really Make a Difference?

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Don’t Be An MS Fatigue Martyr!

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This article made me snicker, not because of the content but because of the ATTITUDE!

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Your Battle Plan for MS Fatigue

Fatigue is probably one of the most complained about Multiple Sclerosis symptoms. We’re not talking about some ordinary fatigue here; but fatigue that incapacitates you physically, mentally, psychologically and emotionally as well. As if having Multiple Sclerosis wasn’t depressing enough, the degree to which your already low reserve of energy and strength is sapped is sufficient to halt any and all activities and often does.

Did you have a plan to do this or that? Well guess what? There’s a very good chance it may not happen. At least not when you had originally planned. Of course, if you’re the one with Multiple Sclerosis, we’re preaching to the choir here. You already know how it can profoundly affect your daily activities, but you should also be encouraged to know that you can do something about it. If you want to counteract the way fatigue impacts your daily life, read on. Continue reading

A Typical Day with MS, and Why I Like Having Multiple Sclerosis

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So it probably sounds strange, to hear me say “I like having MS” but just watch the video. It’s more correct to say I can appreciate certain things about living with MS. I think we create a lot of our experience by the way we choose to look at things, at situations and circumstances. I think we have control over how we look at things, even if we may not control those things themselves. I know my attitude helps me get through things that used to be very, very difficult for me to face. I just needed to look at things differently.

What about you? Do you notice a difference in your energy levels when you’re in a great mood versus when you’re in a crappy one? I don’t mean a “good day” versus a “bad day” physically. I know I can have exactly the same symptomology two different days, the first one can be h*ll to get through and the second one easier just because I’m in a bad or good mood over something else.

How to Talk to Others About Your Multiple Sclerosis Condition

I heartily agree with what Christopher Jacoby has to say in this post. Take a look, read my comments after the post, and let me know what you think by leaving a “comment” of your own:

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The first step in being prepared to deal with people reactions of your Multiple Sclerosis is by understanding your own condition. If you want people to understand your health problem, you’re the one that should educate them. Continue reading

My First MS Symptoms and How I’m Helping Others

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This is my first video interview about this site and why I set it up. I’ve been told that “First is Worst” and it can only get better from here, so I’m hopeful! It was recently pointed out to me that many people with MS develop issues with their vision, so I thought a videoblog would be a better medium of communication (I can’t believe I didn’t think of that, since Optic Neuritis was my first and is one of my recurring symptoms) so I’m going to make an effort to do more videoblogs or at least add audio to the articles.

What’s your opinion? Please share! Click on “comments” link below.

Early Symptoms of Multiple Sclerosis

I came across another great article on the topic of early symptoms of MS. Here it is for your reading enjoyment, and I’ll comment on it afterwards.

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The Early Signs of Multiple Sclerosis

There are several early signs of multiple sclerosis. Have you ever experienced tingling, numbness, loss of balance, weakness in one or more limbs, blurred or double vision? These are some of the most typical signs or symptoms that might suggest to a doctor that you have multiple sclerosis.

The signs may come on so gradually that you may not even know you’re having any symptoms until you look back years later. The signs can range from very mild to very severe. When mild, the signs may be barely noticeable. When severe, you may end up in the hospital wondering what is going on. The doctors may have to put you through several tests to find out the cause of your symptoms. Continue reading

Typical MS Symptoms – Early Signs

Before I was diagnosed with MS, I had no idea what was going on with my body. In my left eye, my colour vision was fading and I was light sensitive to the point of constant nausea. I actually went out and bought an eyepatch – and then drew a skull and crossbones on it with a white-out pen. Aaarrr Matie! As long as my eyes were open I had a headache so bad it bought tears to my eyes, and I felt this bizarre pressure, like there was an ice pick tearing into the back of my eye from inside my head. I found out later this is called “Optic Neuritis.” Continue reading

Dealing with Multiple Sclerosis – what do you do?

In October 2008 I was diagnosed with relapsing/remitting multiple sclerosis after a series of three overlapping attacks earlier that summer. I was “lucky” because my initial MRI showed “textbook perfect presentation” of the plaques in my head (“Doctor, what’s that golf-ball looking thing doing at the bottom of my brain?”) so I didn’t need a spinal tap or any other really invasive procedures for an official diagnosis. Luckily, my diagnosing physician gave me the opportunity to become involved in a stage 2 clinical trial for a drug called Ocrilizumab, so I’ve never been on a beta-blocker like Avonex or any other self-injectable. My medical treatment has consisted of full-day infusions with steroids and the trial drug, once every 6 months for 2 years, and now I’m in an observation phase. I haven’t had a major attack since starting treatment! Woohoo! I am very blessed to have almost no physical symptoms, except for ongoing fatigue, some minor balance issues, and a dull patch of skin on my right outer thigh. I am fully aware of how lucky I am, but I still struggle to get through what used to be a normal day sometimes. The only real issue I still have is what I call “my dumb days” which my Neurologist tells me is a migraine, but I find it mightly suspicious that I’ve never had migraines before. On those days I can’t track information, it’s really difficult to concentrate, and nothing much actually makes it into my short term memory. Frustrating!

Fatigue is a very common and insidious symptom, since it’s not usually physically apparent. I’m not in a wheelchair or using a cane, so it can be challenging to help other people understand that I’m not always able to perform at 100% all the time. Or sometimes even 80%. It’s frustrating because I’m somewhat of a perfectionist and I’m very task-oriented, so doing a good job is very important to me. I realized pretty early that I needed a new way to look at my life, my tasks, and how I go about doing what I do on a daily basis. It’s led me to some choices and compromises, but I feel pretty good about where I am now! I’d love to help you get to a similar place!

So what have you done to cope? Is there something that’s worked really well for you? Do you have a favorite piece of music, or an affirmation that you go back to, or anything else that just makes it easier to get through the day or night?

Please share! Click on the “comments” link below to get started.